Biscayne National Park Geology

There are 42 islands in Biscayne National Park, which anchor together the northern end of the coral rock Florida Keys and transition to the sand barrier islands in the north. They offer a glimpse into what all of the Keys looked like before development. Elliott Key is the park's largest island and is considered the first of the true Florida Keys. Elliott and the keys to the south are the remains of coral reefs, which formed when ocean waters were much higher than they are now. Today, you can see remains of the coral around Elliott Key. The islands to the north of Elliott Key, from Sands Key to Soldier Key, are considered "transitional" islands. They share features of the hard rock coral keys to the south and some with the sand barrier islands to the north. All of the park islands provide a protective barrier for Biscayne Bay and the mainland.

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November's Featured Park
The North Cascades have long been known as the North American Alps. Characterized by rugged beauty, this steep mountain range is filled with jagged peaks, deep valleys, cascading waterfalls and glaciers. North Cascades National Park Service Complex contains the heart of this mountainous region in three park units which are all managed as one and include North Cascades National Park, Ross Lake and Lake Chelan National Recreation Areas.
November's Animal
Badgers are animals of open country. Their oval burrows (ten inches across and four to six inches high) are familiar features of grasslands on sandy or loamy soils of the eastern plains or shrub country in mountain parks or western valleys.