North Platte River

Description:

The North Platte River is a popular fishery that traverses various terrains. The upper 20 miles run through rugged forest. The next 40 miles alternates between agricultural meadows and rugged sagebrush/ juniper communities. The rest of the river to Seminoe Reservoir is primarily rolling sagebrush hills and juniper breaks.The North Platte River is a blue-ribbon "wild" trout fishery from the border all the way to the Pick Bridge access north of Saratoga, about 65 river miles. Seminoe Reservoir, 57 river miles north of Pick Bridge, is popular for its trout and walleye fishing, as well as boating opportunities.All of this section of the North Platte River is floatable, but there are several rapids in the 13 miles just north of the border. The first 5 miles can be floated by raft or kayak only.

Directions:

To access the Upper North Platte River, take State Highway 130 south from I-80 toward Saratoga and Encampment. Watch for brown river access signs. To access the river north of I-80, take County Road 351 north out of Sinclair.

Phone:

307-328-4200

Email:

Rawlins_WYMail@blm.gov

Address:

Rawlins Field Office 1300 North Third Street PO Box 2407 Rawlins, WY 82301

Activities:

Camping Fishing Hiking Hunting Picnicking Wildlife Viewing

Organization:

BLM - Bureau of Land Management

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November's Featured Park
The North Cascades have long been known as the North American Alps. Characterized by rugged beauty, this steep mountain range is filled with jagged peaks, deep valleys, cascading waterfalls and glaciers. North Cascades National Park Service Complex contains the heart of this mountainous region in three park units which are all managed as one and include North Cascades National Park, Ross Lake and Lake Chelan National Recreation Areas.
November's Animal
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Currently Viewing North Platte River