Ojito Wilderness Study Area

Description:

Historically, several human cultures have tried to carve a living from Ojito┬┐s rugged terrain, rocky soils and scarce water supply. Although several types of ruins exist within the area, including those of the Anasazi, Navajo, and Hispanic cultures, very few historical records exist concerning their lives here. Fossil remains of rare dinosaurs, plants and trees have been discovered in the Ojito Wilderness Study Area (WSA). They are found in the 150 million-year-old Jurassic Age Morrison Formation. Because these fossil remains of plants and animals provide critical information about life during this period, it is very important that they remain undisturbed in place until they can be collected and studied by professional paleontologists. Collection of these fossils is prohibited unless authorized by permit.

Directions:

Traveling northwest toward Cuba on US 550 from Bernalillo, the drive is approximately 20 miles. Before San Ysidro (about two miles), turn left onto Cabezon Road (County Road 906). Follow the left fork.

Phone:

(505) 761-8700

Email:

jbeazley@blm.gov

Address:

Rio Puerco Field Office 435 Montano NE Albuquerque, NM 87107

Activities:

Biking Camping Hiking Horseback Riding

Organization:

BLM - Bureau of Land Management

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November's Featured Park
The North Cascades have long been known as the North American Alps. Characterized by rugged beauty, this steep mountain range is filled with jagged peaks, deep valleys, cascading waterfalls and glaciers. North Cascades National Park Service Complex contains the heart of this mountainous region in three park units which are all managed as one and include North Cascades National Park, Ross Lake and Lake Chelan National Recreation Areas.
November's Animal
Badgers are animals of open country. Their oval burrows (ten inches across and four to six inches high) are familiar features of grasslands on sandy or loamy soils of the eastern plains or shrub country in mountain parks or western valleys.
Currently Viewing Ojito Wilderness Study Area