Walker Lake Recreation Area

Description:

The 30,000-acre, 12 mile long by 5 mile wide lake has a shoreline that varies from steep and rocky on the west side to sandy beaches on its east side.. Walker Lake is an oasis for migratory birds including the common loon, snow geese, and white pelicans, several species of grebe, brants, and harlequin ducks. Snowy plovers feed along the shoreline and American avocets and black-necked stilts wade the shallows. Desert Bighorn sheep are often seen on the cliffs along the west side of the lake during the summer months and the occasional pronghorn antelope or wild horse can be spotted browsing along the eastern shore. Due to the declining water levels and the increase in salinity, fishing for Lahontan Cutthroat trout is no longer available. Sportsman's Beach provides 34 developed campsites with cabanas, picnic tables and vault toilets. Tamarack Beach and Twenty Mile Beach provide opportunities for dispersed camping for RV or tents along the shoreline.

Directions:

From Fallon, take US Highway 95 south for 75 miles. Walker Lake is located along the highway.

Phone:

775.885.6000

Email:

ccfoweb@blm.gov

Address:

Carson City District Office 5665 Morgan Mill Rd Carson City, NV 89049

Activities:

Boating Camping Hiking Picnicking Water Sports Wildlife Viewing

Organization:

BLM - Bureau of Land Management

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