White Mountains National Recreation Area

Description:

This 1-million-acre area is used primarily from February to April, when dog-mushers, snowmobilers, and skiers come to take advantage of the winter solitude and northern lights. BLM maintains 11 winter cabins, which are connected by a network of more than 240 miles of groomed winter trails. Much of the area is too wet to hike through in the summer, but Beaver Creek National Wild River and several short trails offer opportunities for adventure.

Directions:

Begin your trip at the BLM office or the Alaska Public Lands Information Center (an interagency office) in Fairbanks, where you can obtain detailed directions, as well as the latest information on trail and weather conditions. Most summer hiking occurs along the Summit Trail at mile 28, Elliott Highway. Other hiking trails, along with campgrounds and gold-panning areas, may be found at Nome Creek, accessible from the U.S. Creek Rd., mile 57, Steese Highway. Winter access is at mile 28 and mile 57, Elliott Highway, and at McKay Creek, mile 42, Steese Highway. BLM has also developed a new winter access point at U.S. Creek, mile 57, Steese Highway.

Phone:

800.437.7021

Email:

AK_FDO_GeneralDelivery@blm.gov

Address:

Bureau of Land Management Fairbanks District Office 1150 University Avenue Fairbanks, AK 99709

Activities:

Auto Touring Boating Climbing Camping Interpretive Programs Fishing Hiking Hunting Off Highway Vehicle Picnicking Winter Sports Wildlife Viewing

Organization:

BLM - Bureau of Land Management

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