Wood Thrush Trail

Description:

One mile loop trail on the 800 acres of the Meadowood SRMA on Mason Neck in Fairfax County, Virginia and plans to manage it to provide open space for recreation, environmental education, and wild horse and burro interpretation. The 800-acre Mason Neck peninsula, approximately 18 miles south of Washington, D.C., is also the site of Gunston Hall - historic home of George Mason IV, author of the Virginia Bill of Rights. Public uses on Mason Neck include the Mason Neck National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) managed by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Mason Neck State Park managed by the Commonwealth of Virginia, and Pohick Bay Regional Park managed by the Northern Virginia Regional Park Authority. Cooperative management of this rural area provides 500 acres for recreation while protecting natural resources. Habitat is provided for migratory and resident waterfowl, bald eagle nesting, feeding, and roosting, and enhancement of species diversity for a variety of wildlife, including blue heron, wood ducks, screech owls, bluebirds, and tree frogs.

Directions:

Take the I-95, Take the VA-642 exit towards LORTON, Turn Left on LORTON RD, Turn Right on GUNSTON COVE RD, Continue on GUNSTON RD, Turn Right on BELMONT BLVD, Continue on Belmont until you see a BLM sign on the right side of the road.

Phone:

703.339.0410

Email:

Theresa_Jefferson@es.blm.gov

Address:

10705 Belmont Blvd Lorton, VA 22079

Activities:

Interpretive Programs Hiking Horseback Riding Visitor Center Wildlife Viewing

Organization:

BLM - Bureau of Land Management

$183
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Currently Viewing Wood Thrush Trail
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Currently Viewing Wood Thrush Trail