Taylor River State Wildlife Area

Description:

Recreation at Taylor River State Wildlife Area is managed by the Colorado Division of Wildlife under agreement with the Bureau of Reclamation. The Division of Wildlife can be reached at 970-641-7070; e mail dan.brauch@state.co.us. The area provides about 1/2 miles of fishing access along the Taylor River below Taylor Park Dam, which is a feature of the Uncompahgre Project. The fishery is catch-and-release and there are no developed recreation facilities beyond a parking lot and river access points. However, there are U.S. Forest Service campgrounds at Taylor Park Reservoir and along the river corridor. The Forest Service can be reached at 970-641-0471 or call 1-800-280-CAMP.Available fish species are brown trout and a few rainbow trout. Whirling disease has limited the rainbow trout fishery so browns are your best bet.

Directions:

The are is about 35 miles northeast of Gunnison, Colorado. The first 11 miles from Gunnison to Almont are paved Colorado Highway 135. From Almont, the last 20 miles are paved Forest Service roads.

Phone:

970-248-0600

Email:

Address:

Western Colorado Area Office Northern Division 2764 Compass Drive Grand Junction, CO 81506

Activities:

Camping Fishing Hiking Picnicking Wildlife Viewing

Organization:

BOR - Bureau of Reclamation

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Currently Viewing Taylor River State Wildlife Area