Canyonlands National Park Backcountry Regulations

Permits are required for all overnight trips in the backcountry. For human waste disposal, use vault toilets where provided. Portable toilets are required for all visitors using designated campsites in the Maze District and at the New Bates Wilson site in the Needles. Backpackers should dig a 4" to 6" deep "cat hole," at least 300 feet from water sources and campsites. Pack out toilet paper. All wood fires are prohibited. Charcoal fires are allowed at designated vehicle campsites. Visitors must use a fire pan and remove unburned charcoal and fire debris. Pets, weapons and littering are prohibited. Pack out all garbage. Disturbing, entering or camping within 300 feet of an archeological or historical site is prohibited.

Collecting artifacts is prohibited. At-large camping is prohibited within one mile of a road or outside the area for which a permit is issued. Camping within 300 feet, or use of soap within 100 feet, of a water source is prohibited. River corridor camping is excluded from this regulation. Camping outside the established campsite boundary at a designated campsite is prohibited. Disturbing or collecting natural features is prohibited. Hunting, feeding or disturbing wildlife is prohibited. Possession or operation of a bicycle or motor vehicle off a designated road is prohibited. ATVs are not permitted.

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Featured Park
Rising above a scene rich with extraordinary wildlife, pristine lakes, and alpine terrain, the Teton Range stands monument to the people who fought to protect it. These are mountains of the imagination. Mountains that led to the creation of Grand Teton National Park where you can explore over two hundred miles of trails, float the Snake River or enjoy the serenity of this remarkable place.
Featured Wildlife
The pika is a close relative of the rabbits and hares, with two upper incisors on each side of the jaw, one behind the other. Being rock-gray in color, pikas are seldom seen until their shrill, metallic call reveals their presence.
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