Cuyahoga Valley National Park

Cuyahoga Valley National Park

Just a short drive from the major metropolitan areas of Cleveland and Akron, Cuyahoga Valley National Park encompasses 33,000 acres along the banks of the Cuyahoga River. Though such a short distance from urban environments, the park is worlds away. The winding Cuyahoga-the "crooked river," as named by American Indians-gives way to rolling floodplain, steep valley walls and ravines, and lush upland forests. Cuyahoga Valley National Park is a refuge for flora and fauna, and provides both recreation and solitude for Northeastern Ohio's residents and visitors. Park trails, from rugged backcountry hiking trails to the Ohio and Erie Canal Towpath Trail, a graded biking and hiking trail, offer something for everyone.

Cultural Legacy

The park has a rich cultural legacy as well. Remains of the Ohio and Erie Canal, which traveled through the valley in the 19th and early 20th centuries, offer a glimpse into the past. Sustainable farming ventures help preserve the valley's agricultural heritage.

Activities

Whether you want to hike, bike, birdwatch, picnic, golf, fish, ski, ride Cuyahoga Valley Scenic Railroad, explore the history of the Ohio and Erie Canal, or attend national park ranger-guided programs, concerts, and art exhibits, Cuyahoga Valley National Park has it all.

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