Sierra National Forest

Description:

Activities on the Forest ----Select One------Accessible Recreation OpportunitiesBoatingCampingFirearm SafetyFishingHikingHorseback Riding/Pack StationsLakesMining RegulationsNational Recreation Reservation SystemOff-Highway VehiclesRecreation Residence ProgramPetsScenic BywaysViewing Autumn ColorsWildernessWhite Water RaftingWinter Sports         HELP US PROTECT YOUR FORESTSPlease preserve and protect your National Forests. To do this, try to leave natural areas the way you find them, by practicing conservation ethics. Do not carve, chop, cut and damage any live trees. They have done nothing to deserve this treatment, and damaged trees cheapen the natural experience for others. Try to leave your camp or picnic site a little cleaner than you found it; the next visitor will thank you. There are campgrounds on the Sierra National Forest that use the Pack it In, Pack it Out program for dealing with waste. This means that garbage cans are not provided. Campers are asked to bring their own garbage bags and take their garbage with them when leaving the campsite. While this seems like an inconvenience, the funds saved are used to provide additional recreational facilities. Do not bury litter; forest animals can smell it and will dig it up.

Directions:

Phone:

Email:

public_affairs@fs.fed.us

Address:

, CA

Activities:

Hiking Fire Lookouts/cabins Overnight

Organization:

FS - USDA Forest Service

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Currently Viewing Sierra National Forest