Amagansett National Wildlife Refuge

Description:

The Amagansett NWR graces the shore of the Atlantic Ocean on Long Island's south fork. Established December 16,1968, the 36-acre refuge is of special significance in the protection and management of fragile shore habitat and wildlife. Its unique double dune system embodies marine sand beach, primary dunes, secondary dunes, swales, fens, cranberry bogs, and oak scrub. Many rare plants, including several orchids, occur on the refuge. A major purpose of the refuge is the protection of the secondary dunes, which have become scarce on Long Island due to development. Long-tailed ducks, white winged scoter, common loon and horned grebe spend winter off the refuge shore, while shorebirds, songbirds and raptors are a treat to visiting wildlife watchers during spring and fall. Merlin, Cooper's hawk, kestrel, sharp-shinned hawk, and peregrine falcon soar over the dunes during migration. Ipswich sparrow, rough-legged hawk, and short eared owl spend winter at the refuge offering birders a cold-weather destination. In late spring and summer the beach hosts piping plover, and common and least terns (protected by the Endangered Species Act) as well as sandpiper and other shorebirds. The Eastern hognose snake, a New York State designated species of special concern, can still be found on the refuge.

Directions:

The refuge is adjacent to Atlantic Avenue, off Route 27 in Amagansett, NY.

Phone:

631-286-0485

Email:

longislandrefuges@fws.gov

Address:

Atlantic Ave. Amagansett, NY 11930

Activities:

Fishing Hiking Wildlife Viewing Photography

Organization:

FWS - Fish and Wildlife Service

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