Bosque del Apache National Wildlife Refuge

Description:

Bosque del Apache, which means "woods of the Apache", was named for the people who often camped in the riverside forest. Today it is know as one of the most spectacular Refuges in North America. This 57,191 acre refuge straddles the Rio Grande Valley in Socorro County, New Mexico. It ranges in elevation from 4,500 to 6,272 fee above sea level. It receives approximately 7 inches of precipitation each year. Within the refuge borders lie three wilderness areas totaling approximately 30,850 acres and five research natural areas totaling 18,500 acres.

Directions:

Situated just off Interstate 25 midway between Albuquerque and Las Cruces, Socorro is the nearest town to the refuge. To reach the refuge from Socorro, drive eight miles south on I-25 to exit 139, continue east one-fourth mile on US 380 to the flashing signal at San Antonio, turn right onto Old Highway 1, continue south nine miles to the Visitor Center. From Las Cruces, drive north on I-25 to exit 124 (San Maracial), then north on Old Highway 1 to the Visitor Center.

Phone:

505-835-1828

Email:

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Address:

P.O. Box 1246 Socorro, NM 87801

Activities:

Auto Touring Interpretive Programs Fishing Hiking Hunting Visitor Center Wildlife Viewing

Organization:

FWS - Fish and Wildlife Service

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