Camas National Wildlife Refuge

Description:

About half of the Camas National Wildlife Refuge in southeastern Idaho consists of lakes, ponds, and marshlands; the remainder is grass sagebrush uplands, meadows, and farm fields. Camas Creek flows through the length of the refuge. During migration, which peaks in March-April and October, up to 50,000 ducks and 3,000 geese may be present on the refuge. Tundra and trumpeter swans visit in the hundreds during migration. The refuge has become a popular swan watching destination with hundreds of tundra and trumpeter swans stopping over during migration. Several state record songbird observations have been made in refuge cottonwood groves on the refuge. Water management is a critical component of Camas Refuge operations. An extensive system of canals, dikes, wells, ponds, and water-control structures is used to manipulate water for the benefit of wildlife, with an emphasis on nesting waterfowl. Haying and prescribed fire are used to manipulate vegetation in some fields, and small grain crops are grown to provide supplemental feed for geese and cranes and to keep them from damaging private croplands.

Directions:

From Interstate 15, take the Hamer exit (exit 150), turn east and go about a quarter of a mile into the little village of Hamer. Turn north on the frontage road, continue about 3 miles then turn west. Continue nearly 2 miles to the refuge. There are signs after you turn off the interstate.

Phone:

208-662-5423

Email:

Rob_Larranaga@fws.gov

Address:

2150 East 2350 North Hamer, ID 83425

Activities:

Auto Touring Hunting Wildlife Viewing

Organization:

FWS - Fish and Wildlife Service

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