Cedar Island National Wildlife Refuge

Description:

Cedar Island National Wildlife Refuge, located in Carteret County, North Carolina is on the end of a peninsula marking the southern end of Pamlico Sound. The refuge lies five miles east of the Atlantic ocean and about 40 miles northeast of Beaufort, North Carolina. Established in 1964, the refuge consists of approximately 11,000 acres of irregularly-flooded, brackish marsh and 3,480 acres of pocosin and woodland habitat. The dominant marsh plants include black needlerush, saltmarsh cordgrass, saltmeadow hay, and saltgrass. The woodland areas are dominated by loblolly, longleaf and pond pine. Live oak is also abundant on some upland sites. The marsh and surrounding waters provide wintering habitat for thousands of ducks and nesting habitat for colonial waterbirds.

Directions:

The refuge lies about 5 miles northeast of the community of Atlantic and about 40 miles northeast of Beaufort, North Carolina. Access to the refuge is via US 70 and NC Highway 12 from Morehead City. Cedar Island can also be accessed by ferry from Ocracoke Island.

Phone:

252-926-4021

Email:

mattamuskeet@fws.gov

Address:

38 Mattamuskeet Road Swan Quarter, NC 27885

Activities:

Boating Fishing Hunting

Organization:

FWS - Fish and Wildlife Service

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Currently Viewing Cedar Island National Wildlife Refuge