Cold Springs National Wildlife Refuge

Description:

In the arid but seasonally-cold desert of northeastern Oregon, an oasis for wildlife has appeared where water and desert mingle. The 3,117 acre Cold Springs Refuge consists of rich and diverse wetland habitats surrounded by upland habitat of big sagebrush and native steppe grasses. A riparian component of willow and cottonwood provides refuge for birds, mammals, and other animals in this unique desert environment. Located in Umatilla County near Hermiston, Oregon, the refuge was established in 1909 as a preserve and breeding ground for native birds. Management has broadened to include conservation and restoration of native habitat and species characteristic to this desert ecosystem. Refuge wetlands support large numbers of wintering waterfowl while adjacent riparian habitat supports a rich abundance of songbirds and healthy populations of western mule deer and desert elk. Refuge visitors have easy access to this popular refuge for hunting, fishing, and wildlife watching.

Directions:

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Phone:

509-545-8588

Email:

David_Linehan@fws.gov

Address:

Loop Rd, approximately 6 miles from Hermiston, OR

Activities:

Boating Fishing Hiking Hunting Wildlife Viewing

Organization:

FWS - Fish and Wildlife Service

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Currently Viewing Cold Springs National Wildlife Refuge
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Currently Viewing Cold Springs National Wildlife Refuge