Crystal River National Wildlife Refuge

Description:

The Crystal River National Wildlife Refuge, was established in 1983 specifically for the protection of the endangered West Indian Manatee. This unique refuge preserves the last unspoiled and undeveloped habitat in Kings Bay, which forms the headwaters of the Crystal River. The refuge preserves the warm water spring havens, which provide critical habitat for the manatee populations that migrate here each winter.

Directions:

Information about the Crystal River NWR can be obtained by visiting the refuge headquarters, located in Crystal River, Florida. The headquarters can be accessed from U.S. 19, which runs through the Town of Crystal River. A directional sign located on both sides of the highway, at the intersection of U.S. 19 and S.E. Paradise Point Drive. Turn onto Paradise Point Drive and proceed west, following the road. As Paradise Point Drive curves toward the north, it will change names and become Kings Bay Drive. The headquarters building is located at 1502 S.E. Kings Bay Drive, which is on the left side of the road, immediately adjacent to the Port Hotel and Marina.

Phone:

352-563-2088

Email:

chassahowitzka@fws.gov

Address:

1502 S.E. Kings Bay Drive Crystal River, FL 34429

Activities:

Boating Interpretive Programs Fishing

Organization:

FWS - Fish and Wildlife Service

$194.95
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