Dahomey National Wildlife Refuge

Description:

Dahomey NWR is located 15 miles south west of Cleveland, Mississippi. It was established in 1990 when the Nature Conservancy (TNC) purchased 9,269 and leased the land back to the Service for management. In 1993, the Service completed acquisition of the TNC lands. One additional 162 acre tract was purchased by the Mississippi Department of Transportation (MDOT) and turned over to the Service in 1991. A 260 acre 16th section tract is leased from the West Bolivar School Board bringing the total land base to 9,691 acres. The refuge is the largest remaining tract of bottomland hardwood-forested wetlands in the northwest portion of Mississippi.

Directions:

From Cleveland, go south on HWY 61 and turn west on HWY 446 at Boyle. Refuge properties are signed and lie north and south of HWY 446 about 15 miles west of Boyle. From Rosedale, head south on HWY 1 through Beulah. Five and one half miles south of Beulah, turn east on HWY 446. Refuge properties start 2.5 miles east of HWY 1, are signed and lie north and south of HWY 446. The refuge headquarters is located on the north side of HWY 446.

Phone:

662-742-9331

Email:

Address:

Box 831 Hwy 446 Boyle, MS 38730

Activities:

Auto Touring Fishing Hunting

Organization:

FWS - Fish and Wildlife Service

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