Fallon National Wildlife Refuge

Description:

Fallon National Wildlife Refuge was established in 1931 as a refuge and breeding ground for birds and wild animals. It is located in the Lahontan Valley of western Nevada, at the terminus of the Carson River. The refuge comprises over 15,000 acres of playa and wetland habitat in the Carson Sink. In years of high water flows down the Carson River, the refuge is important for migratory shorebirds and waterfowl. However, due to diversions, in most years there is insufficient water flow down the Carson River for the water to enter the refuge. The refuge is open 7 days a week, 24 hours a day, but there are no facilities on the refuge. Roads are primitive and passable only during those periods of dry weather.

Directions:

Fallon Refuge is 15 miles north of Fallon on Indian Lakes Road. To visit the refuge, it is best to stop at the Stillwater Refuge headquarters at 1020 New River Parkway, Suite 305 (located off of Harrigan Road on the east side of the City of Fallon) to obtain a map and directions. Roads in the Fallon Refuge area are not marked and can become confusing.

Phone:

775-423-5128

Email:

stillwater@fws.gov

Address:

Indian Lakes Rd, 15 mile north of Fallon, NV

Activities:

Organization:

FWS - Fish and Wildlife Service

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