Fish Springs National Wildlife Refuge

Description:

Fish Springs National Wildlife Refuge (NWR), located at the southern end of the Great Salt Lake Desert, was established in 1959 to provide habitat for migrating and wintering birds. The Refuge is named for the native Utah chub that is found throughout the Refuge springs and impoundments. Totaling 17,992 acres, the Refuge supports 10,000 acres of lush, spring-fed wetlands, a critical habitat in the arid Great Basin. The water from the springs is brackish and warm.

The Refuge has a very rich cultural history. Native American tribes are thought to have occupied the area more than 10,000 years ago. Modern inhabitation dates back to 1861.

Directions:

From Salt Lake City, follow Interstate 80 west to the junction of Utah Highway 36 at Exit 99. Take Utah Highway 36 south for approximately 40 miles to the intersection of the Pony Express Road, just east of Faust. Turn right and follow the gravel road for approximately 61 miles to the Refuge entrance. From Delta, take U.S. Highway 6 north to the intersection with Utah Highway 174. Turn left on Utah Highway 174 and follow approximately 42 miles to the end of the paved road. Continue straight on the gravel road for approximately 15 miles to the junction with the Pony Express Road. Turn left and proceed approximately 3/4 mile to the Refuge entrance. The Refuge headquarters is approximately seven miles from the east entrance.

Phone:

435-831-5353

Email:

fishsprings@fws.gov

Address:

P.O. Box 568 Dugway, UT 84022

Activities:

Auto Touring Boating Historic & Cultural Site Hunting Wildlife Viewing

Organization:

FWS - Fish and Wildlife Service

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