Grays Lake National Wildlife Refuge

Description:

Grays Lake National Wildlife Refuge is the largest hardstem bulrush marsh in North America. Located in a high mountain valley near Soda Springs in southeastern Idaho, the refuge and surrounding mountains offer incredible scenic vistas, wildflowers, and fall foliage displays. Lands adjacent to the 19,400-acre refuge are primarily wet meadows and grasslands. Grays Lake Refuge provides breeding habitat for over 200 species of mammals, birds, fish, and amphibians. The refuge hosts a large nesting population of greater sandhill cranes; as many as 1200 individuals are counted in the valley during migration and staging times. The refuge is a birding destination, and a good area to view the rare trumpeter swans. This near-pristine montane wetland is being threatened by the same type of suburban/rural development that has so heavily impacted nearby Jackson Hole.

Directions:

Grays Lake Refuge is north of Soda Springs, off Route 34. The turnoff is about 27 miles north of Soda Springs, and 21 miles from Freedom, Wyoming. The turnoff is signed. From the intersection it is about 3 miles north to the refuge office, visitor center, and overlook.

Phone:

208-574-2755

Email:

Aaron_Drew@fws.gov

Address:

74 Grays Lake Rd Wayan, ID 83285

Activities:

Hunting Visitor Center Wildlife Viewing

Organization:

FWS - Fish and Wildlife Service

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Currently Viewing Grays Lake National Wildlife Refuge
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Currently Viewing Grays Lake National Wildlife Refuge