James River National Wildlife Refuge

Description:

James River National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) is one of four refuges that comprise the Eastern Virginia Rivers National Wildlife Refuge Complex. The Refuge encompasses 4,200 acres of forest and wetland habitats along the James River, bordered by Powells Creek to the west, and the historic Flowerdew Hundred Plantation to the east. Located in Prince George County, Virginia, the refuge is 8 miles southeast of the City of Hopewell and thirty miles southeast of the City of Richmond. The Refuge was created in 1991 to protect nesting and roosting habitat for the threatened American bald eagle. A secondary objective is to provide an opportunity to view wildlife in its natural environment, so that the public may better appreciate the refuge's role in conservation of wildlife resources.

Directions:

From Richmond, take Interstate 295 south to Route 10. Take Route 10 south/east toward Hopewell. After passing through Hopewell, proceed another 8 miles to Route 639. Take a left and look for the Refuge entrance sign.

Phone:

804 829 9020

Email:

cyrus_brame@fws.gov

Address:

Flowerdew Hundred Road Prince George, VA 23831

Activities:

Hunting

Organization:

FWS - Fish and Wildlife Service

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