John Hay National Wildlife Refuge

Description:

The refuge consists of the former estate of John Hay, private secretary to Abraham Lincoln, Ambassador to Great Britain, and Secretary of State under Presidents McKinley and Roosevelt. The refuge was established in 1987 and the historic buildings and immediate grounds and gardens, also known as "The Fells", are managed through an agreement with the Friends of John Hay National Wildlife Refuge (Friends). To contact the Friends, call or email Karen Zurheide (kzurheide.fells@tds.net (603) 763-4789 (x4)).

The remainder of the 164-acre refuge is managed for migratory birds and resident wildlife by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. The refuge also protects almost one mile of undeveloped shoreline along Lake Sunapee.

Directions:

From interstate 89, take Route 103 west towards the town of Newbury, New Hampshire. Then take Route 103A north approximately two miles and the refuge will be on your left.

Phone:

413-548-8002 ext. 111

Email:

andrew_french@fws.gov

Address:

Route 103A Newbury, NH 3255

Activities:

Historic & Cultural Site Interpretive Programs Hiking

Organization:

FWS - Fish and Wildlife Service

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