Karl E. Mundt National Wildlife Refuge

Description:

The Lake Andes National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) Complex is comprised of Lake Andes NWR, Karl E. Mundt NWR, and Lake Andes Wetland Management District (WMD). The Complex headquarters is located on the east shore of Lake Andes.

Wildlife habitat on the Complex is extremely important to conservation of waterfowl, bald eagles, and grassland birds. The Complex occupies the southern portion of the Prairie Pothole Region - also known as the "Duck Factory". Many ducks rely on this habitat to successfully raise their young. The area also hosts migrant waterfowl populations in the tens and hundreds of thousands during peak fall and spring migration periods. The Karl E. Mundt NWR provides important habitat for 100-300 bald eagles. The Refuge protects one of the most critical bald eagle winter roosts in the country. Waterfowl and other ground-nesting birds also benefit from wetlands and grasslands protected on the Lake Andes WMD.

Directions:

The Lake Andes NWR Complex headquarters is located on the east shore of Lake Andes. From Ravinia, South Dakota, travel 2 miles north on the county gravel road and 1.5 east to reach the Refuge headquarters. From the community of Lake Andes, travel north .5 mile then east 3.5 miles on a hard-surfaced county road, crossing the Lake from west to east before reaching the office and visitor center nestled under the cottonwoods.

Phone:

605-487-7603

Email:

LakeAndes@fws.gov

Address:

38672 291 ST Lake Andes, SD 57356

Activities:

Organization:

FWS - Fish and Wildlife Service

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