Kern National Wildlife Refuge

Description:

Kern National Wildlife Refuge is located in the southern portion of California's San Joaquin Valley, 20 miles west of the city of Delano. Situated on the southern margin of what was once the largest freshwater wetland complex in the western United States, Kern Refuge provides optimum wintering habitat for migratory birds with an emphasis on waterfowl and water birds. Through restoration and maintenance of native habitat diversity, the refuge also provides suitable habitat for several endangered species as well as preserving a remnant example of the historic valley uplands in the San Joaquin Desert. Approximately 5,500 visitors annually participate in refuge programs ranging from waterfowl hunting to wildlife viewing.

Directions:

From Interstate 5: At Lost Hills and Interstate 5, take Highway 46 east 5 miles to Corcoran Road and turn north. Drive 10.6 miles to the refuge at the intersection of Corcoran Road and Garces Highway. From Highway 99: At Delano, exit Highway 99 at the Highway 155 exit. Turn south on Highway 155, which is Garces Highway. Travel 19 miles west on Garces Highway to the refuge entrance at the intersection of Corcoran Road and Garces Highway.

Phone:

661-725-2767

Email:

Dave_Hardt@fws.gov

Address:

10811 Corcoran Rd Delano, CA 93215

Activities:

Auto Touring Hunting

Organization:

FWS - Fish and Wildlife Service

$129
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Currently Viewing Kern National Wildlife Refuge
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Currently Viewing Kern National Wildlife Refuge