Maxwell National Wildlife Refuge

Description:

Located in the high central plains of northeastern New Mexico, Maxwell National Wildlife Refuge was established in 1965 as a feeding and resting area for migratory birds. Over 350 acres of the Refuge are planted with wheat, corn, barley, and alfalfa to provide food for resident and migratory wildlife. Visitors may see bald and golden eagles, falcons, hawks, sandhill cranes, ducks, white pelicans, burrowing owls, great horned owls, black-tailed prairie dogs, coyotes, mule deer, white-tailed deer, and the occasional elk.

Directions:

Located on Refuge Road, 1.5 miles north of the intersection of Refuge Road and State Road 505, the administrative office is open Monday through Friday from 7:30 am to 4:00 pm. Public entry into the refuge is available off State Road 445 and State Road 505.

Phone:

505-375-2331

Email:

fw2_rw_maxwell@fws.gov

Address:

P.O. Box 276 Maxwell, NM 87728

Activities:

Boating Fishing Wildlife Viewing

Organization:

FWS - Fish and Wildlife Service

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Currently Viewing Maxwell National Wildlife Refuge
November's Featured Park
The North Cascades have long been known as the North American Alps. Characterized by rugged beauty, this steep mountain range is filled with jagged peaks, deep valleys, cascading waterfalls and glaciers. North Cascades National Park Service Complex contains the heart of this mountainous region in three park units which are all managed as one and include North Cascades National Park, Ross Lake and Lake Chelan National Recreation Areas.
November's Animal
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Currently Viewing Maxwell National Wildlife Refuge