Mingo National Wildlife Refuge

Description:

Located in the upper end of the lower Mississippi River valley, Mingo National Wildlife Refuge, at 21,676 acres, is the only large remnant of bottomland hardwoods remaining out of an original 2 1/2 million acres in the Missouri bootheel. A major migration and wintering area for migratory waterfowl, populations of 125,000 mallards and 75,000 Canada geese have been recorded. Bald eagles have been successively nesting on the refuge since 1985. The refuge contains approximately 14,000 acres of bottomland hardwoods, 1,000 acres of upland hardwoods, 1,275 acres of cropland and moist soil units (see Management Activities), 700 acres of grasslands, and 4,700 acres of marsh and water. There are seven natural areas on the refuge and over 140 identified archaeological sites. In 1976, 7,730 acres were designated as a wilderness area. The Mingo Job Corps Civilian Center is located on the southeast corner of the refuge.

Directions:

Located approximately 150 miles south of St. Louis, the refuge is twenty five miles northeast of Poplar Bluff, Missouri. The Visitor Center is located 1.5 miles north of Puxico on Highway 51.

Phone:

573-222-3589

Email:

mingo@fws.gov

Address:

24279 State Highway 51 Puxico, MO 63960

Activities:

Auto Touring Boating Interpretive Programs Fishing Hiking Hunting Visitor Center Wildlife Viewing

Organization:

FWS - Fish and Wildlife Service

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