Necedah National Wildlife Refuge

Description:

Whooping cranes, wolves, Karner blue butterflies, and white-tailed deer call Necedah National Wildlife Refuge "home." Ringed bog hunter dragonflies live in sedge meadows, flying squirrels in upland hardwood timber. Trumpeter swans inhabit the marshes, and badgers the savanna. The habitat mosaic, maintained by prescribed burning, seasonal mowing, and timber clearing, attracts a wide range of wildlife. Each species and habitat is monitored and maintained to insure overall vigor of the ecosystem. The 43,656-acre refuge was established in 1939 as a refuge and breeding ground for migratory birds and other wildlife.

Directions:

Located in central Wisconsin, Necedah National Wildlife Refuge is 180 miles southeast of Minneapolis, Minnesota, and 150 miles northwest of Milwaukee, Wisconsin. The refuge lies north of Highway 21 and west of Highway 80, with all but a few acres in Juneau County. To reach the main entrance and office complex, travel 15 miles east on Highway 21 from Interstate 94 at Tomah, Wisconsin; or about three miles west on Highway 21 from Necedah, Wisconsin. Turn north onto Headquarters Road and travel about two miles to the headquarters.

Phone:

608-565-2551

Email:

necedah@fws.gov

Address:

W7996 20th St. W Necedah, WI 54646

Activities:

Auto Touring Boating Interpretive Programs Fishing Hunting Wildlife Viewing

Organization:

FWS - Fish and Wildlife Service

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