North Central Valley Wildlife Management Area

Description:

Located within 11 counties in the Sacramento Valley and the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta of California, North Central Valley Wildlife Management Area consists of conservation easements acquired on privately-owned wetlands (primarily waterfowl hunting clubs). The landscape is very flat, bordered by the Sierra and Coast ranges and is surrounded by intensive agriculture. The purpose of the project is to protect wetland habitat by acquiring conservation easements on up to 55,000 acres of land; this includes approximately 8,500 acres of existing wetlands and 46,500 acres of former wetlands to be restored and developed for waterfowl and other wetland-related wildlife. The area is an expansion of the highly successful Butte Sink and Willow Creek-Lurline Wildlife Management Areas and is implemented in accordance with the habitat acquisition goals of the Central Valley Habitat Joint Venture of the North American Waterfowl Management Plan. Conservation easement requires landowners to maintain land in wetlands.

Directions:

These privately-owned lands are closed to public access.

Phone:

530-934-2801

Email:

sacramentovalleyrefuges@fws.gov

Address:

11 counties, CA

Activities:

Organization:

FWS - Fish and Wildlife Service

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November's Featured Park
The North Cascades have long been known as the North American Alps. Characterized by rugged beauty, this steep mountain range is filled with jagged peaks, deep valleys, cascading waterfalls and glaciers. North Cascades National Park Service Complex contains the heart of this mountainous region in three park units which are all managed as one and include North Cascades National Park, Ross Lake and Lake Chelan National Recreation Areas.
November's Animal
Badgers are animals of open country. Their oval burrows (ten inches across and four to six inches high) are familiar features of grasslands on sandy or loamy soils of the eastern plains or shrub country in mountain parks or western valleys.
Currently Viewing North Central Valley Wildlife Management Area