Pelican Island National Wildlife Refuge

Description:

Pelican Island holds a unique place in American history, because on March 14, 1903, President Theodore Roosevelt designated it as the Nation's first National Wildlife Refuge to protect brown pelicans and other native birds nesting on the island. This was the first time the federal government set aside land for the sake of wildlife. The Refuge celebrates its Centennial Anniversary in 2003 and now the refuge system consists of more than 530 refuges on nearly 95 million acres of our nation's most important wildlife habitats.

Directions:

From I-95, take Exit 156 towards Sebastian via CR 512 to US 1. There are opportunities to view the historic island's bird life on guided boat tours through local tour operators or kayak. There are 2 local tour operators off US 1, and one located in Sebastian Inlet State Park off of A1A. Contact the Indian River Chamber of Commerce for more information by calling 772/567-3491 or visit http://vero-beach.fl.us/chamber/visitor.html and look at their recreation pages under "Fishing and Watersports."

Phone:

772-562-3909

Email:

pelicanisland@fws.gov

Address:

1339 20th Street Vero Beach, FL 32960

Activities:

Boating Fishing

Organization:

FWS - Fish and Wildlife Service

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Featured Park
Rising above a scene rich with extraordinary wildlife, pristine lakes, and alpine terrain, the Teton Range stands monument to the people who fought to protect it. These are mountains of the imagination. Mountains that led to the creation of Grand Teton National Park where you can explore over two hundred miles of trails, float the Snake River or enjoy the serenity of this remarkable place.
Featured Wildlife
The pika is a close relative of the rabbits and hares, with two upper incisors on each side of the jaw, one behind the other. Being rock-gray in color, pikas are seldom seen until their shrill, metallic call reveals their presence.
Currently Viewing Pelican Island National Wildlife Refuge