Presquile National Wildlife Refuge

Description:

Presquile National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) is one of four refuges that comprise the Eastern Virginia Rivers National Wildlife Refuge Complex. The Refuge is a 1329-acre island in the James River, located approximately 20 miles south of Richmond, Virginia. Established to protect habitat for wintering waterfowl and other migratory birds, Presquile is an important component in the network of refuges on and around the Chesapeake Bay, our Nation's largest estuary. Presquile historically provided important habitat for wintering Canada geese that breed along James Bay in eastern Canada. The Refuge is also home to nesting and roosting bald eagles. The Refuge is primarily hardwood swamp, with a fringe of marsh and 300 acres of upland fields.

Directions:

From Richmond, take Interstate 295 south to Route 10. Take Route 10 south/east toward Hopewell. Take a left on Route 827. Stay on 827, toward Bermuda Hundred, until you see the Refuge entrance. The gate will be locked unless prior arrangements have been made with the Refuge Complex headquarters.

Phone:

804-829-9020

Email:

cyrus_brame@fws.gov

Address:

Hopewell, Chesterfield Co., VA

Activities:

Hunting Visitor Center

Organization:

FWS - Fish and Wildlife Service

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