Rappahannock River Valley National Wildlife Refuge

Description:

Rappahannock River Valley National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) is the newest of four refuges that comprise the Eastern Virginia Rivers National Wildlife Refuge Complex. Established in 1996, the goal of the Refuge is to protect 20,000 acres of wetlands and associated uplands along the River and its major tributaries. As of May 2005, a total of 7,393 acres have been purchased from willing sellers or donated by Refuge partners, including 1,033 acres of conservation easements. With help from our conservation partners, including Chesapeake Bay Foundation, The Conservation Fund, The Nature Conservancy, and The Trust for Public Land, we are well on our way toward achieving our land protections goal.

Directions:

From Tappahannock, Virginia, take US-360 E (across the Rappahannock River, toward Warsaw). Follow US-360 E for 4.1 miles, then turn LEFT onto Rt. 624/Newland Rd. Follow Newland Rd. for 4.2 miles, then turn LEFT onto Strangeway/Rt 636. Follow Strangeway for 1/4 mile, then turn RIGHT onto Sandy Lane/Rt 640. Follow Sandy Lane for 1.1 miles, then turn LEFT into Rappahannock River Valley NWR.

Phone:

(804) 333-1470

Email:

fw5rw_evrnwr@fws.gov

Address:

336 Wilna Road Warsaw, VA 22572

Activities:

Organization:

FWS - Fish and Wildlife Service

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