Sabine National Wildlife Refuge

Description:

Sabine NWR,about 8 miles south of Hackberry, on State Highway 27, was established in 1937 to provide habitat for migratory waterfowl and other birds. The refuge consists of a basin of wetlands located between the Gulf's beach cheniers (oak ridges)and the coastal prairie, which is one of the most productive and fertile areas of North America. It encompasses 124,511 acres of fresh,intermediate and brackish marshes and is one of the largest estuarine-dependent marine species nurseries in southwest Louisiana. It has also been designated as an "Internationally Important Bird Area" due to the numerous wading, water and marsh birds that utilize it throughout the year. Over 280,000 people visit the refuge annually. The exhibits in the refuge visitor center and the Wetland Walkway are considered two of the principal tourist attractions in southwest Louisiana. The refuge is an integral part of the Creole Nature Trail All American Road

Directions:

Sabine NWR is located about 22 miles south of Sulphur, Louisiana. Take Exit 20 off of Interstate 10 in Sulphur. Turn south on Highway 27 and proceed south through Hackberry. The Refuge Headquarters/Visitor Center is located approximately 8 miles south of Hackberry on the East side of Highway 27.

Phone:

337-762-3816

Email:

sabine@fws.gov

Address:

3000 Holly Beach Highway Hackberry , LA 70645

Activities:

Boating Interpretive Programs Fishing Hiking Hunting Visitor Center Wildlife Viewing

Organization:

FWS - Fish and Wildlife Service

$167.39 10% off
While Shimano's mechanical front derailleurs have always worked flawlessly to deliver quiet, precise gear shifts, its...
Price subject to change | Available through Backcountry.com
Currently Viewing Sabine National Wildlife Refuge
October's Featured Park
Arches National Park is known for its' remarkable natural red sandstone arches. With over 2,000 catalogued arches that range in size from a three-foot opening, to Landscape Arch which measures 306 feet from base to base, the park offers the largest concentration of natural arches in the world.
October's Animal
Most commonly found in the tundra of Rocky Mountain National Park, the pika is a close relative of the rabbits and hares, with two upper incisors on each side of the jaw, one behind the other. Being rock-gray in color, pikas are seldom seen until their shrill, metallic call reveals their presence.
Currently Viewing Sabine National Wildlife Refuge