Sheldon National Wildlife Refuge

Description:

The Sheldon National Wildlife Refuge protects more than half a million acres of high desert habitat for large wintering herds of pronghorn antelope, scattered bands of bighorn sheep, and a rich assortment of other wildlife. The landscape is vast, rugged, and punctuated with waterfalls, narrow gorges, and lush springs among rolling hills and expansive tablelands of sagebrush and mountain mahogany. Although established for the protection of wildlife and habitat, the refuge encompasses other interesting features. The remains of old homesteads and ranches intrigue visitors. The lure of fire opals draws miners and rock collectors to the Virgin Valley mining district. Geothermal hot springs create a refreshing oasis in the heart of the refuge. The refuge's mosaic of resources and public interests generates significant management challenges.

Directions:

Highway 140 provides access into the heart of Sheldon Refuge. From Lakeview, Oregon, travel 68 miles east on 140. From Denio, Nevada, travel 14 miles west on Highway 40.

Phone:

775-941-0200

Email:

Brian_Day@fws.gov

Address:

Hwy 40, 14 miles west of Denio, NV

Activities:

Auto Touring Boating Historic & Cultural Site Interpretive Programs Fishing Hiking Hunting Wildlife Viewing

Organization:

FWS - Fish and Wildlife Service

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Currently Viewing Sheldon National Wildlife Refuge