Siletz Bay National Wildlife Refuge

Description:

Siletz Bay National Wildlife Refuge consists of some of the most scenic estuarine habitat along the Oregon Coast National Scenic Byway. On either side of Highway 101, starched skeleton trees jut forth from the Siletz estuary and are reminiscent of a time when the salt marsh was fully diked. Red tailed hawks, bald eagles, and other raptors can often be seen roosting at the top of these snags; and a variety of estuarine-dependent birds including great blue heron, great egret and many species of waterfowl can be seen foraging in the tidally influenced waters. The Siletz Bay Refuge has an active land acquisition program and now totals over 500 acres, with several acquisitions pending. The refuge protects high quality coastal wetlands and uplands next to Siletz Bay from encroaching development, and enhances habitat for a variety of birds and mammals. The Siletz Bay and River system supports large runs of anadromous fish including Chinook and Coho salmon, cutthroat trout, and steelhead. Juvenile salmonids will benefit from several planned tidal marsh restoration. Wildlife using the refuge include brown pelicans (endangered species), bald eagles (threatened species), peregrine falcons, Aleutian and dusky Canada geese, waterfowl, wading birds, shorebirds, and neotropical migrants.

Directions:

Siletz Bay Refuge is on Highway 101, just south of Lincoln City. The refuge is closed to public use, but wildlife can be viewed from the highway.

Phone:

541-867-4550

Email:

oregoncoast@fws.gov

Address:

7020 SE Hwy 101 Lincoln City, OR

Activities:

Wildlife Viewing

Organization:

FWS - Fish and Wildlife Service

$124.95
Whether you're looking to put in some real hours at the job site or the ski hill, reach for the Analog Men's ATF Daily...
Price subject to change | Available through Backcountry.com
October's Featured Park
Arches National Park is known for its' remarkable natural red sandstone arches. With over 2,000 catalogued arches that range in size from a three-foot opening, to Landscape Arch which measures 306 feet from base to base, the park offers the largest concentration of natural arches in the world.
October's Animal
Most commonly found in the tundra of Rocky Mountain National Park, the pika is a close relative of the rabbits and hares, with two upper incisors on each side of the jaw, one behind the other. Being rock-gray in color, pikas are seldom seen until their shrill, metallic call reveals their presence.
Currently Viewing Siletz Bay National Wildlife Refuge