Stillwater National Wildlife Refuge

Description:

The Stillwater National Wildlife Refuge Complex consists of Stillwater Refuge, Fallon Refuge, and Anaho Island Refuge in western Nevada. Together, these refuges encompass approximately 163,000 acres of wetland and upland habitats, freshwater and brackish water marshes, cottonwood and willow riparian areas, alkali playas, salt desert shrub lands, sand dunes, and a 500-acre rocky island in a desert lake. Nearly 400 wildlife species, including more than 260 bird species rely on these habitats. The refuges provide important migration, breeding, and wintering habitat for up to 1 million migratory birds, including waterfowl, shorebirds, colonial nesting water birds, and neotropical migratory birds. Stillwater and Fallon Refuges are part of the Lahontan Valley Shorebird Reserve, one of only 16 sites recognized for their international importance by the Western Hemispheric Shorebird Reserve Network. The Lahontan Valley wetlands also are listed as a Globally Important Bird Area by the American Bird Conservancy. Anaho Island Refuge provides secure habitat for one of the largest American white pelican breeding colonies in the western United States. To provide a secure environment for nesting birds, Anaho Island Refuge is closed to all public use.

Directions:

From Fallon, Nevada, follow U.S. Highway 50 east approximately 5 miles. Turn left onto Stillwater Road and follow the "Watchable Wildlife" signs to the refuge entrance (approximately 15 miles). Visitors are encouraged to stop at the refuge Field Office at 1020 New River Parkway, Suite 305 (located off of Harrigan Road on the east side of the City of Fallon) to obtain a map and additional information prior to visiting the refuge.

Phone:

775-423-5128

Email:

stillwater@fws.gov

Address:

1020 New River Parkway Suite 305 Fallon, NV 89406

Activities:

Auto Touring Boating Interpretive Programs Hiking Hunting

Organization:

FWS - Fish and Wildlife Service

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Currently Viewing Stillwater National Wildlife Refuge