Toppenish National Wildlife Refuge

Description:

In the agriculturally-intensive Yakima Valley of eastern Washington, there is a wildlife oasis--the Toppenish National Wildlife Refuge. Using the waters of Toppenish and Snake Creeks and supplemented with summer irrigation, managers are able to provide a mosaic of refuge wetlands interspersed with lush riparian and native upland habitats. Wetland habitats rich with food attract thousands of wintering waterfowl, and during the summer, provide breeding grounds for an array of wetland-dependent birds, mammals, and plants. Winding its way through the refuge, Toppenish Creek serves an important role as one of the last remaining streams where Columbia River steelhead, one of America's endangered species, still reproduce in good numbers. Toppenish Refuge is a place where people observe spectacular concentrations of waterfowl or participate in wildlife-dependent recreation such as hunting, wildlife photography or environmental education programs.

Directions:

From the town of Toppenish, take Highway 97 south approximately 10 miles. The refuge entrance is on the west side of Highway 97.

Phone:

509-865-2405

Email:

David_Linehan@fws.gov

Address:

State Rte 97, 10 miles south of Toppenish, WA

Activities:

Hunting Wildlife Viewing

Organization:

FWS - Fish and Wildlife Service

$223
The original Oakley Radar was a sports optics game-changer when it landed in the pro peloton in 2007. It was...
Price subject to change | Available through Backcountry.com
October's Featured Park
Arches National Park is known for its' remarkable natural red sandstone arches. With over 2,000 catalogued arches that range in size from a three-foot opening, to Landscape Arch which measures 306 feet from base to base, the park offers the largest concentration of natural arches in the world.
October's Animal
Most commonly found in the tundra of Rocky Mountain National Park, the pika is a close relative of the rabbits and hares, with two upper incisors on each side of the jaw, one behind the other. Being rock-gray in color, pikas are seldom seen until their shrill, metallic call reveals their presence.
Currently Viewing Toppenish National Wildlife Refuge