Tualatin River National Wildlife Refuge

Description:

Tualatin River National Wildlife Refuge is located at the northern end of the Willamette Valley near Sherwood, Oregon. The concept of creating the refuge originated from local citizens, cities, and governments, and so, it enjoys strong popular support, stemming from a desire to preserve green space where future generations can take part in outdoor recreation and education. Habitats include remnant and restored communities along rivers and streams, emergent, shrub, and forested wetlands, riparian forests, oak and pine meadows and grasslands, and mixed deciduous/coniferous forests common to western Oregon prior to settlement. These habitats are known primarily for their importance to salmon and steelhead, wintering Canada goose, pintail and mallard ducks, and for providing breeding habitat for songbirds.

Directions:

Tualatin River Refuge is located off of Highway 99W approximately 15 miles southwest of downtown Portland near Sherwood. From the North: Drive southbound on Highway 99W and continue through the town of King City. Approximately .7 miles beyond the Cipole Rd traffic light, turn right into the refuge. Look for brown highway guide signs. From the South: Drive northbound on Highway 99W, approximately 1 mile north of Tualatin-Sherwood Road. Look for highway brown highway guide signs directing you to make a U-turn in order to enter into the refuge.

Phone:

503-590-5811

Email:

Kim_Strassburg@fws.gov

Address:

16507 SW Roy Rogers Rd Sherwood, OR 97140

Activities:

Organization:

FWS - Fish and Wildlife Service

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