Upper Ouachita National Wildlife Refuge

Description:

The refuge provides excellent wintering habitat for tens of thousands of ducks and geese. The endangered red-cockaded woodpecker and the threatened Louisiana black bear are found on Upper Ouachita NWR. Other wildlife species that call the refuge home include alligators, deer, turkey, squirrels, bald eagles and beaver. Upper Ouachita NWR is one of the four refuges managed in the North Louisiana Refuges Complex.

Directions:

Although Upper Ouachita NWR does not have a visitor center, many points of access are available to the public. Access Finch Bayou Recreation area and the scenic River Road on the west side of the refuge by way of La. Hwy 143. From Haile, Louisiana, turn east on Hooker Hole Road. Drive four miles and turn north onto River Road. Visitors can access the east side of the refuge in Morehouse Parish by way of Bastrop, Louisiana. From U.S. Hwy 165 turn west on Hang Out Road and travel 5 miles. Turn left on Meter Station Road. Go straight into the parking lot. For more access points onto the refuge, refer to a refuge brochure. Refuge headquarters are located on D'Arbonne NWR.

Phone:

318-726-4400

Email:

northlarefuges@fws.gov

Address:

11372 Highway 143 Farmerville, LA 71363

Activities:

Boating Interpretive Programs Fishing Hunting

Organization:

FWS - Fish and Wildlife Service

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