Wapack National Wildlife Refuge

Description:

Wapack National Wildlife Refuge was New Hampshire's first refuge and was established through a donation in 1972. The 1,672-acre refuge is located about 20 miles west of Nashua, New Hampshire and encompasses the 2,278 ft. North Pack Monadnock Mountain. The refuge is a popular hawk migration area and provides nesting habitat for numerous migratory songbirds such as the tree sparrow, Swainson's thrush, magnolia warbler, corssbills, pine grosbeaks and white-throated sparrow. The refuge also supports a wide variety of upland wildlife inlcuding deer, bear, coyote, fisher, fox, mink and weasel. A three mile segment of the 21-mile Wapack Trail, a spur of the Appalachian Trail, cuts through the refuge and rewards hikers with a beautiful view of the surrounding mountains.

Directions:

The refuge portion of the Wapack Trail is most readily accessible from the parking area of Miller State Park located off Route 101 southeast of Peterborough, New Hampshire. The trail is also accessible from Old Mountain Road which borders the north edge of the refuge.

Phone:

603-431-7511

Email:

jimmie_reynolds@fws.gov

Address:

Route 101 Peterborough, NH 3468

Activities:

Wildlife Viewing

Organization:

FWS - Fish and Wildlife Service

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Currently Viewing Wapack National Wildlife Refuge