Glacier National Park Hiking

Over half of the visitors to Glacier National Park report taking a hike. That's a lot of hikers, but over 700 miles of trail provide many outstanding opportunities for both short hikes and extended backpacking trips.

Hikers need to assume individual responsibility for planning their trips and hiking safely. Before setting out on your hike, stop by a park visitor center to obtain needed warnings and recommondations. You will increase your odds of a safe hike, decrease your disturbance to park wildlife, and lessen cumulative damage to resources.

Visitor center bookstores carry a complete line of trail guides, topographic maps and field guides to aid the hiker. Publications are also available by mail. Call the Glacier Natural History Association at (406) 888-5756, to request a catalog.

Five self-guided walks interpret trailside features with brochures and signs. The Trail of the Cedars, Huckleberry Mountain, Hidden Lake, Sun Point, and Swiftcurrent Nature Trails encourage hikers to experience Glacier National Park at their own pace. The Trail of the Cedars is wheelchair accessible.

Good day hikes are plentiful. Visitor center staff will be happy to assist you with your choices and provide free maps of popular trails in park.

Overnight Trips

Hikers planning to camp overnight in Glacier's backcountry must stop at a visitor center or ranger station and obtain a backcountry permit.

Transportation

Glacier Park Inc. , offers a shuttle service to various locations and trailheads along the Going-to-the-Sun Road, as well as to West Glacier, East Glacier, Many Glacier, Two Medicine, Chief Mountain, and Waterton Townsite (in conjunction with a Canadian service) .

Guide Service

Glacier Wilderness Guides offers guided day hikes and backpacking trips into Glacier's backcountry.

$168.95
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