Grand Canyon National Park New Zealand Mudsnail

The New Zealand mudsnail, Potamopyrgus antipodarum was first discovered in the Snake River, Idaho in the 1980's. It is now rapidly spreading throughout the western US and has become established in rivers in seven western states and three national parks. It was discovered in the tailwaters below Glen Canyon Dam in March 2002. Subsequent searches in Grand Canyon found it distributed more than 225 miles downstream from the dam, so it was likely introduced several years earlier. Mudsnail populations often reaches densities greater than 100,000 per square meter in suitable habitat, and the species is associated with alterations in primary production and decreases in native invertebrate populations in rivers that it has invaded. Biologists are concerned about potential impacts it may have on native species, fisheries, and aquatic ecosystems in the western US.

$209.95
Whether you live five minutes away from a trailhead or not, throw on your Lowa Women's Locarno GTX QC Hiking Boots and...
Price subject to change | Available through Backcountry.com
Currently Viewing Grand Canyon National Park New Zealand Mudsnail
Featured Park
Rising above a scene rich with extraordinary wildlife, pristine lakes, and alpine terrain, the Teton Range stands monument to the people who fought to protect it. These are mountains of the imagination. Mountains that led to the creation of Grand Teton National Park where you can explore over two hundred miles of trails, float the Snake River or enjoy the serenity of this remarkable place.
Featured Wildlife
The pika is a close relative of the rabbits and hares, with two upper incisors on each side of the jaw, one behind the other. Being rock-gray in color, pikas are seldom seen until their shrill, metallic call reveals their presence.
Currently Viewing Grand Canyon National Park New Zealand Mudsnail