Grand Canyon National Park New Zealand Mudsnail

The New Zealand mudsnail, Potamopyrgus antipodarum was first discovered in the Snake River, Idaho in the 1980's. It is now rapidly spreading throughout the western US and has become established in rivers in seven western states and three national parks. It was discovered in the tailwaters below Glen Canyon Dam in March 2002. Subsequent searches in Grand Canyon found it distributed more than 225 miles downstream from the dam, so it was likely introduced several years earlier. Mudsnail populations often reaches densities greater than 100,000 per square meter in suitable habitat, and the species is associated with alterations in primary production and decreases in native invertebrate populations in rivers that it has invaded. Biologists are concerned about potential impacts it may have on native species, fisheries, and aquatic ecosystems in the western US.

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November's Featured Park
The North Cascades have long been known as the North American Alps. Characterized by rugged beauty, this steep mountain range is filled with jagged peaks, deep valleys, cascading waterfalls and glaciers. North Cascades National Park Service Complex contains the heart of this mountainous region in three park units which are all managed as one and include North Cascades National Park, Ross Lake and Lake Chelan National Recreation Areas.
November's Animal
Badgers are animals of open country. Their oval burrows (ten inches across and four to six inches high) are familiar features of grasslands on sandy or loamy soils of the eastern plains or shrub country in mountain parks or western valleys.
Currently Viewing Grand Canyon National Park New Zealand Mudsnail