Grand Canyon National Park Springs and Seeps

Spring flow from the South Rim of the Grand Canyon is a significant resource of Grand Canyon National Park. Springs offer refuge to endemic and exotic terrestrial wildlife species of Grand Canyon and maintain the riparian areas that are associated with this resource. Recent development on the southern part of the Colorado Plateau has raised the awareness of environmentalists, commercial developers, and resource managers to the value of spring resources. Springs issue from regional and local water-bearing sedimentary rocks of the Colorado Plateau. The impact of regional pumping on the water quantity and quality of these delicate and rare ecosystems is unknown and current hydrologic models show that some flow reduction will occur to some springs.

Although springs make up less than 0.01% of Grand Canyon's landscape, 500 times more species concentrate in them than in the surrounding desert. Researchers have discovered that each spring is far more unique than expected: many contain rare species found nowhere else in the world. When visiting seeps, springs, and streams, please be at least 100 feet away from the water before using soaps or urinating. Human feces must be burried at least 100 feet away from any water resource.

$274.95
Just because it's raining and snowing doesn't mean you get to hang up your tools and go home, so Dakine built the...
Price subject to change | Available through Backcountry.com
Currently Viewing Grand Canyon National Park Springs and Seeps
November's Featured Park
The North Cascades have long been known as the North American Alps. Characterized by rugged beauty, this steep mountain range is filled with jagged peaks, deep valleys, cascading waterfalls and glaciers. North Cascades National Park Service Complex contains the heart of this mountainous region in three park units which are all managed as one and include North Cascades National Park, Ross Lake and Lake Chelan National Recreation Areas.
November's Animal
Badgers are animals of open country. Their oval burrows (ten inches across and four to six inches high) are familiar features of grasslands on sandy or loamy soils of the eastern plains or shrub country in mountain parks or western valleys.
Currently Viewing Grand Canyon National Park Springs and Seeps