Grand Canyon National Park Springs and Seeps

Spring flow from the South Rim of the Grand Canyon is a significant resource of Grand Canyon National Park. Springs offer refuge to endemic and exotic terrestrial wildlife species of Grand Canyon and maintain the riparian areas that are associated with this resource. Recent development on the southern part of the Colorado Plateau has raised the awareness of environmentalists, commercial developers, and resource managers to the value of spring resources. Springs issue from regional and local water-bearing sedimentary rocks of the Colorado Plateau. The impact of regional pumping on the water quantity and quality of these delicate and rare ecosystems is unknown and current hydrologic models show that some flow reduction will occur to some springs.

Although springs make up less than 0.01% of Grand Canyon's landscape, 500 times more species concentrate in them than in the surrounding desert. Researchers have discovered that each spring is far more unique than expected: many contain rare species found nowhere else in the world. When visiting seeps, springs, and streams, please be at least 100 feet away from the water before using soaps or urinating. Human feces must be burried at least 100 feet away from any water resource.

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