Grand Teton National Park Disturbed Lands

Events often take place that alter the balance of an ecosystem and affect the species within. Areas can become altered, or "disturbed," through a natural or human-caused occurrence. Natural disturbances range from earthquakes to fires to floods to volcanoes that may occur periodically in a region. Human-caused disturbances include road construction, agriculture, and urban/suburban development. Disturbed lands may be barren, void of plant and animal life, following an incident. Some native species of plants thrive after a disruption of the natural balance.

The first returnees to a burned area, for instance, are grasses that take advantage of increased sunlight, decreased shade, increased nutrients in the soil, and lower acidity levels in the soil. After a disturbance, the topsoil is susceptible to erosion in the form of landslides after rainfall. Often a disturbed area is threatened by the generation of invasive, non-native, or exotic plant and animal species. This is evident along roadsides in Grand Teton National Park that contain fields of Canada thistle, Houndstongue, Yellow Toadflax (Butter and Eggs), and mullein. These new species do not have natural environmental controls (e.g. predators) and can easily out-compete native species. Eventually disturbed land may become dominated by non-native species.

$279.95
The Look Pivot 12 Dual Ski Binding is the kid brother of the legendary Pivot 14 and 18, but that doesn't mean it can't...
Price subject to change | Available through Backcountry.com
November's Featured Park
The North Cascades have long been known as the North American Alps. Characterized by rugged beauty, this steep mountain range is filled with jagged peaks, deep valleys, cascading waterfalls and glaciers. North Cascades National Park Service Complex contains the heart of this mountainous region in three park units which are all managed as one and include North Cascades National Park, Ross Lake and Lake Chelan National Recreation Areas.
November's Animal
Badgers are animals of open country. Their oval burrows (ten inches across and four to six inches high) are familiar features of grasslands on sandy or loamy soils of the eastern plains or shrub country in mountain parks or western valleys.