Grand Teton National Park Mountains

Grand Teton National Park inspires your sense of wonder. Magnificent mountains tower over a valley bisected by the Snake River. This beautiful valley, overlooked on the western edge by an impressive skyline, is known as Jackson Hole. The Teton Range dominates the landscape of the park. The range began rising 2 to 13 million years ago. There were numerous earthquakes that released tension along the Teton Fault to create a vertical offset of 23,000 feet. However, when you view the range you will see that the Grand Teton at 13,770 feet, stands only about 7,000 feet above the valley floor.

Most of the elevation change has been buried in this gravity driven environment. Erosion is filling the valley in but it also bestowed the Teton Range with a rugged appearance. The terrain and lack of foothills allures outdoor enthusiasts of all types to visit this area. Climbers can find at least 12 peaks in the Teton Range over 12,000 feet high with varying degrees of difficulty.

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November's Featured Park
The North Cascades have long been known as the North American Alps. Characterized by rugged beauty, this steep mountain range is filled with jagged peaks, deep valleys, cascading waterfalls and glaciers. North Cascades National Park Service Complex contains the heart of this mountainous region in three park units which are all managed as one and include North Cascades National Park, Ross Lake and Lake Chelan National Recreation Areas.
November's Animal
Badgers are animals of open country. Their oval burrows (ten inches across and four to six inches high) are familiar features of grasslands on sandy or loamy soils of the eastern plains or shrub country in mountain parks or western valleys.