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Rocky Mountain National Park

Great Smoky Mountains National Park

Great Smoky Mountains National Park, established in June of 1934, is one of the largest protected areas in the Eastern United States. World renowned for the diversity of its

plant and animal life , the beauty of its ancient mountains, the quality of its remnants of Southern Appalachian mountain culture, and the depth and integrity of its wilderness sanctuary, the park attracts over nine million visitors each year. Hiking is a common activity for park visitors.

More than 850 miles of hiking trails traverse the Great Smoky Mountains. They range from easy to difficult and provide half hour walks to week-long backpacking trips. The Appalachian Trail runs for 70 miles along the Park's top ridge. For waterfall enthusiasts, waterfalls adorn most every stream in the Smokies. Fall is a spectacular time of year to visit Great Smoky Mountains National Park and an auto tour of the park offers panoramic views, tumbling mountain streams, weathered historic buildings, and uninterrupted forest stretching to the horizon. Great Smoky Mountains has more than enough activities to offer you and your family when visiting. So pack your bags and head for the Smokies!

Highlights of Great Smoky Mountains National Park

Waterfalls Looking for waterfalls? Great Smoky Mountains National Park has an abundance of waterfalls to keep you happy. Get out your cameras and have a great visit!

Fall Colors If you are planning a visit to Great Smoky Mountains in fall, here are some tips to getting the best experience out of your fall foliage trip!

Appalachian Trail The Appalachian Trail meanders the crest of the Smokies and runs approximately 69 miles along the North Carolina-Tennessee boarder.

Story of the Chestnut Blight in Great Smoky Mountains

by Dan Williams

Beginning around the turn of the 20th century, a series of devastating exotic tree diseases accidentally entered North America. These diseases existed in ecological balance in their native lands where host trees they attacked had enough resistance to ensure recovery. North American forests provided tree types suitable as hosts to the diseases, but with little or no inbred resistance to their onslaught.