Hot Springs National Park Activities

Touring the Visitor Center and the Bathhouse Row area are highly recommended. We also recommend strolling Bathhouse and the Grand Promenade, hiking, picnicking, camping at Gulpha Gorge Campground, and taking a thermal bath at one of the many concessionaires.

The Visitor Center is a museum offering self-guiding tours of the former Fordyce Bathhouse. Guided tours are also offered some days. You may make a reservation for a guided tour for a group by calling the visitor center at least two weeks in advance.

The Grand Promenade is a landscaped walkway behind Bathhouse Row which offers a glimpse of the protected springs and historic landscape features. Accessible entrances are from behind the Visitor Center and from Fountain Street.

The approximately 26 miles of day-use hiking trails in the park (mountain bikes are prohibited) beckon the walker to see the forested Ouachita Mountains. Scenic mountain drives on West Mountain, Hot Springs, and North Mountains afford overlooks to the surrounding area. An observation tower on top of Hot Springs Mountain is operated by a concessioner and offers a birds-eye-view of the Zig Zag range of the Ouachitas.

Picnic tables on the Grand Promenade, Hot Springs Mountain, West Mountain, and at Gulpha Gorge offer a place to enjoy a meal outdoors.

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November's Featured Park
The North Cascades have long been known as the North American Alps. Characterized by rugged beauty, this steep mountain range is filled with jagged peaks, deep valleys, cascading waterfalls and glaciers. North Cascades National Park Service Complex contains the heart of this mountainous region in three park units which are all managed as one and include North Cascades National Park, Ross Lake and Lake Chelan National Recreation Areas.
November's Animal
Badgers are animals of open country. Their oval burrows (ten inches across and four to six inches high) are familiar features of grasslands on sandy or loamy soils of the eastern plains or shrub country in mountain parks or western valleys.