Joshua Tree National Park Activities

For a first-time visitor the desert may appear bleak and drab. Viewed from the road, the desert only hints at its vitality. Closer examination reveals a fascinating variety of plants and animals. A rich cultural history and surreal geologic features add to the attraction of this place. Joshua Tree National Park offers visitors endless opportunities for exploration and discovery. Depending on the number of hours you have to spend, your interests and energy, here are some ideas to consider:

If you have four hours or less,

begin your tour at a park visitor center. Park staff will be happy to provide you with current information about conditions in the park as well as answers to your questions.

With limited time you may want to confine your sightseeing to the main park roads. Many pullouts with wayside exhibits dot these roads. There are 12 self-guiding nature trails. Consider experiencing at least one of these walks during a short park visit.

On clear days the vista from Keys View extends beyond Salton Sea to Mexico and is well worth the additional 20-minute drive.

If you plan to spend an entire day,

there will be time to walk several nature trails. A ranger-led program will add enjoyment and understanding to your visit. Check at visitor centers and on campground bulletin boards for listings, or call ahead and reserve a spot on the popular Keys Ranch guided walking tour. If solitude is what you are after, plan an all-day hike into the backcountry.

Some visitors like to experience the desert from the seat of a mountain bike . The park offers an extensive network of dirt roads that make for less crowded and safer cycling than the paved main roads.

Joshua Tree has gained international attention as a superb rock-climbing area. Many visitors enjoy just watching the rock climbers in action.

With more than one day in the park,

your options increase. There are nine campgrounds and backcountry camping is permitted.

Books and topographic maps, available at park sales areas, give information needed for longer hikes. For and#147;peak baggers,and#148; the park has ten mountains greater than 5,000 feet (1,524 m) in elevation. Or make it your goal to hike to all the park oases. Other trails lead you to remnants of the gold mining era, a colorful part of the park's cultural history.

Whatever you choose, your time will be rewarding. The desert holds much more than what is readily apparent to the casual observer. A note of caution: The desert, fascinating as it is, can be life-threatening for those unfamiliar with its potential dangers. It is essential that you carry water with you;even if you are only driving through. Cars break down; keys get locked inside; accidents happen.

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