Mount Rainier National Park Indian Bar Trail

Trail Description Distance, round-trip: 14.5 miles Elevation gain: 2900 feet in, 800 feet out Highest elevation 5914 Hiking time, round-trip: Allow two days Wilderness camps: Yes A unique section of the Wonderland Trail. Miles of ridge-walking through alpine meadows with views of the southeast side of Mount Rainier, ending in a broad green valley into which pour a dozen waterfalls. One of the legendary places in the Park. A great spot to sit in the moonlight on a late-August night and listen to the bull elk bugling. Generally snow-free late July through September. Along the Trail The first one mile is easy walking on a moderate gr4ade to Nickel Creek. Good campsites along the stream and on the far bank. In another 1/2 mile is a small creek, the last water before Indian Bar. From Nickel Creek the way climbs steadily to the Cowlitz Divide, reaching the crest in a bit less than 3 miles from the road. Here are junctions with the abandoned Backbone Ridge Trail and the trail from Ohanapecosh. The next 4 1/2 miles are along the crest of the Cowlitz Divide, going up and over some bumps and contouring around others.

At times the way is very steep. First there are glimpses of The Mountain through trees. Then the trail climbs higher, the meadows grow larger, and finally, atop a 5914-foot knoll, The Mountain comes completely and grandly into the open. To the southeast is Bald Knob. Beyond is Shriner Peak. From the knoll the trail drops 800 feet to 5120-foot Indian Bar. The Ohanapecosh River divides the large green meadow. The shelter cabin is on the west side of the river. At the valley head are small remnants of the Ohanapecosh Glacier. In early summer numerous waterfalls splash down the lava cliffs. Just 100 feet below the shelter is Wauhaukaupauken Falls, a name almost larger than the falls. Don't forget the considerable elevation gain on the return hike. If transportation can be arranged, Indian Bar can be combined with hiking the Summerland Trail for a beautiful one-way trip of 17 miles. Trailhead Location Drive the Stevens Canyon Road west 10 miles from the Stevens Canyon Entrance, or east 11 miles from the Longmire-Paradise road, to the parking lot at Box Canyon (elevation 3050 feet). Find the signed gravel trail directly across the highway from the parking area. Do not take the paved nature trail by mistake.

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November's Featured Park
The North Cascades have long been known as the North American Alps. Characterized by rugged beauty, this steep mountain range is filled with jagged peaks, deep valleys, cascading waterfalls and glaciers. North Cascades National Park Service Complex contains the heart of this mountainous region in three park units which are all managed as one and include North Cascades National Park, Ross Lake and Lake Chelan National Recreation Areas.
November's Animal
Badgers are animals of open country. Their oval burrows (ten inches across and four to six inches high) are familiar features of grasslands on sandy or loamy soils of the eastern plains or shrub country in mountain parks or western valleys.