Mount Rainier National Park Mount Fremont Trail

Trail Description Distance, round-trip: 5.5 miles Elevation gain: 1200 feet Hiking time, round-trip: 3 hours Wilderness camps: No From the trailhead near the restrooms at Sunrise, this trail climbs for 0.3 mile, then follows Sourdough Ridge west. At 1.5 miles, just past Frozen Lake, you'll find a five-way junction. From there, the trail traverses the west side of a rocky ridge for another 1.3 miles to a fire lookout built in the 1930s. Along the Trail The entire trail from Sunrise to the lookout is through meadowland and over rocky crags. On a clear day hikers can enjoy superb views of Mount Rainier, the Cascades and the Olympic Mountains. North of the lookout lie the spectacular meadows of Grand Park. Trailhead Location Several Sunrise trails share the same trailhead at the north end of the Sunrise parking area.

The trail to Mount Fremont Lookout is among them. Please note: off-trail hiking is not allowed in the Sunrise area. Backpacking The closest camps to Mount Fremont Lookout are located near Sunrise and at the northern end of Berkeley Park. There is no camping at or around the lookout itself. Permits are required for camping. Permits and current trail conditions are available park-wide from Wilderness Information Centers, Ranger Stations, and Visitor Centers. Fires are prohibited. No pets on trails. Treat water before drinking.

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Featured Park
Rising above a scene rich with extraordinary wildlife, pristine lakes, and alpine terrain, the Teton Range stands monument to the people who fought to protect it. These are mountains of the imagination. Mountains that led to the creation of Grand Teton National Park where you can explore over two hundred miles of trails, float the Snake River or enjoy the serenity of this remarkable place.
Featured Wildlife
The pika is a close relative of the rabbits and hares, with two upper incisors on each side of the jaw, one behind the other. Being rock-gray in color, pikas are seldom seen until their shrill, metallic call reveals their presence.