Mount Rainier National Park Tolmie Peak Trail

Trail Description Distance, round-trip: 6.5 miles Elevation gain: 1010 feet Hiking time, round-trip: 3 hours Wilderness camps: None In 1833, Dr. William Tolmie sailed from London to Fort Vancouver where he awaited assignment. After seeing "The Mountain," he was captivated and subsequently made a visit to collect "herbs of which to make medicine." Research now shows that Tolmie actually ascended Hessong Rock. The trail leads hikers 1.25 miles through the forest to a trail junction, first downhill, then steeply uphill 1.0 mile to Eunice Lake. The last mile from Eunice Lake to Tolmie Peak Lookout is steep but well worth the effort! The subalpine meadows and shore around Eunice Lake are easily damaged. Try to minimize your impact on this delicate environment by hiking only on the constructed trails and resting or picnicking on rocks near the trail. Along the Trail Pause a moment at Ipsut Pass to enjoy the view of the Carbon River Valley to the north.

Continue to the lookout for more spectacular views! Trailhead Location Take SR 165 to the Mowich Lake Road. After driving almost 17 miles on this rough and dusty gravel road, hikers are ready to find the trailhead! It is located on the left at the lake. Backpacking Neither Tolmie Peak nor Eunice Lake have wilderness camps. However, crosscountry camping opportunities exist nearby for skilled minimum impact backpackers who prefer a primitive camping experience. Permits are required for camping. Permits and current trail conditions are available at park-wide from Wilderness Information Centers, Ranger Stations, and Visitor Centers. Treat water before drinking. Fires are prohibited. No pets on trails.

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Featured Park
Rising above a scene rich with extraordinary wildlife, pristine lakes, and alpine terrain, the Teton Range stands monument to the people who fought to protect it. These are mountains of the imagination. Mountains that led to the creation of Grand Teton National Park where you can explore over two hundred miles of trails, float the Snake River or enjoy the serenity of this remarkable place.
Featured Wildlife
The pika is a close relative of the rabbits and hares, with two upper incisors on each side of the jaw, one behind the other. Being rock-gray in color, pikas are seldom seen until their shrill, metallic call reveals their presence.